Verifying DMI Pool Data in Windows 95/98

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Overview:

The Desktop Management Interface (DMI) is a new method of managing computers in an enterprise. The main component of DMI is the Management Information Format Database, or MIFD (the DMI Pool Data). This database contains all the information about the computing system and its components.

At times, some systems may experience a hang condition after partitioning, formatting and initial boot-up of a hard drive. In Windows 95 and 98, changes to the motherboards BIOS settings, changes in hard drives or to hard drive settings alters this pool data. The message, "Verifying DMI Pool Data" appears and the system hangs. This condition may continue even after the physical drive has been removed from the system.

! WARNING ! ALL SUGGESTIONS LISTED HERE ARE BIOS RELATED. FOR A PERMANENT SOLUTION, WE RECOMMEND THAT USERS CONSULT THEIR SYSTEM OR MOTHERBOARD MANUFACTURER FOR BIOS UPGRADES.

Possible Resolution Methods:

Method One:

  1. Apply power to the computer.
  2. Access the system BIOS.
  3. Save the BIOS changes and reboot the PC to a System Boot Diskette.
  4. Shut down the PC after the memory count is displayed.
  5. Reconnect the power and interface cables to the hard drive.
  6. Access the System BIOS.
  7. Auto-Detect the hard drive. Ensure that the LBA Mode option is enabled.
  8. Save the BIOS changes and restart the PC with a System Diskette.
  9. Partition and format the hard drive via the operating system.
  10. Restart the system. On boot, the screen should read:

Method Two:

  1. Apply power to the computer.
  2. Access the System BIOS.
  3. Disable both the Internal and External CPU Cache. These features are located in either the "BIOS Features" or "Advanced Settings" options of the BIOS Setup.
    NOTE: Consult the System or Motherboard User's Manual for exact location of the Internal and External CPU Cache settings.
  4. Save the BIOS changes and restart the PC to a System Boot Diskette. On startup, the screen should read:
  5. After the system successfully boots, re-start the PC and access the system BIOS.
  6. Enable the External CPU Cache. This feature is located in the "BIOS Features" or "Advanced Settings".
    NOTE: Consult the System or Motherboard User's Manual for exact location of the External CPU Cache setting.
    ! WARNING ! User's MUST re-enable this feature after resolving the problem for optimal system performance.
  7. Save the BIOS changes and restart the PC to a System Boot Diskette. On startup, the screen should read:

NOTE: If the aforementioned methods fail to resolve the issue, contact the system or motherboard manufacturer to either clear the CMOS or flash update the BIOS for your motherboard. This will entail either:

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